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30 day novel

by on January 6, 2012

For those who have not heard, I was inspired by the national novel writing month. I thought, what better way to get started writing? I was right; it was a good way to start. Unfortunately for me, I have never been much of a writer or reader for that matter.

Lessons Learned – I will blog in more detail later about these 7 lessons, but for now here they are.

1st – Good stories take time. Most of the 30 days I was developing mythology, history, and learning who my characters are. Now that I know I can start telling the story.

2nd – I lost heart about chapter 5. I had a good story, but I could see my ability to translate that story into words was weak.

3rd – I am more creative when I am happy than when I am stressed or afraid. It was hard to find my voice from stress and fear of failure.

4th – It is very helpful to have support when you lose faith in yourself. Someone who can put things into perspective and cheer you on.

5th – Even though I didn’t like what I produced, it is not wasted. Even if I have to remove those chapters from my book. I learned about some of my characters, my writing style, my mistakes and can improve now that I know.

6th – The rules for entertaining are very different when your performance is dependent on the words you choose for your book, than the visuals, lighting, music and sounds on the stage.  I need to take time to learn how to apply entertaining rules to writing.

7th – Disabilities can be a strength if we let them. You can’t let anything hold you back.  Being unique can attract new readers.

Life Happens – Just because I want to write a book in 30 days doesn’t mean life stops or even slows down.

1st – Some times life gets busier. Christmas time is not the best month for me to take on a 30 day novel. I want to have family time more than writing time.

2nd – I home school my toddler, preschooler, and kindergartener. Finding time to write with 3 kids under 6 can be difficult; add homeschooling to the mix and it can be near impossible.

3rd – Starting more than one writing goal in the same month can be overwhelming. I also decided to start blogging this December. Consequently I spent most of my writing time blogging not noveling. I have heard that blogging is kind of like a warm up for the big things like a novel.  So I don’t feel bad about it.

4th – Another factor that was difficult for me was the fact that this novel was to be a gift for my husband. I was not able to create with him or share really any of my story ideas with him. I have found I am more creative when I have someone to create with me and bounce ideas off of.

So Now What?

Although I did not start and finish a 50,000 word novel in 30 days. I am happy with what I accomplished. It was what I needed to get started. I will someday tell the story I found in those 30 days, but for now it is not the most pressing goal I have in my life right now. I need to raise my kids and practice my writing and get blogging. Yes I will continue to work on my story but it will be a year-long project this next year.  I have a great start and look forward to finding the rest of the story.  What are the lessons you learned or advice you would give to a beginning author?

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From → Writing

2 Comments
  1. Awesome! I love the lessons learned.

  2. Keep trying. I’ve done and won NaNo every year since ’06. When I first did it, my total writing wasn’t 50,000 words – and that was about seven years worth.

    The more you practice, the better you’ll get, especially in turning ideas into words. It was something I struggled with, and the main reason I actually hated to write until I was about ten years old.

    I’d also suggest finding a beta reader – if possible, someone else who writes. I can’t begin to explain how much this has helped me improve as well, as it lets someone else put their mind to everything I write. We catch different things, and see different things, and thus, the story can be improved more.

    Just a bit of advice there. I can give more, but I’m not sure I’d be able to stop giving it.

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